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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Howdy,

Does anybody know the drag coefficient of the K27? Also, how much of this is contributed by the side mirrors?
 

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Howdy,

Does anybody know the drag coefficient of the K27? Also, how much of this is contributed by the side mirrors?
Hey @fanfare! Very good question, the design doesn't look that aerodynamic but I imagine its tiny size helps a lot. Haven't seen anything about the drag coefficient yet but in general side mirrors can add quite a bit of drag to a car. Here's a interesting study about it.


The simulation was performed at a range of velocities between 80 km/h (22.22 m/s) to 120 km/h (33.33 m/s). The results obtained from the simulation were validated with published results and show at low subsonic speeds, the drag coefficient of the car is almost constant. A shorter side mirror mount would decrease the drag coefficient of the side mirror by 1- 5%. In addition, a smaller side mirror produces a lower drag coefficient of the side mirror by 14-43%. Finally, increasing the radius of housing curvature would decrease the drag coefficient of the side mirror.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hey @fanfare! Very good question, the design doesn't look that aerodynamic but I imagine its tiny size helps a lot. Haven't seen anything about the drag coefficient yet but in general side mirrors can add quite a bit of drag to a car. Here's a interesting study about it.


The simulation was performed at a range of velocities between 80 km/h (22.22 m/s) to 120 km/h (33.33 m/s). The results obtained from the simulation were validated with published results and show at low subsonic speeds, the drag coefficient of the car is almost constant. A shorter side mirror mount would decrease the drag coefficient of the side mirror by 1- 5%. In addition, a smaller side mirror produces a lower drag coefficient of the side mirror by 14-43%. Finally, increasing the radius of housing curvature would decrease the drag coefficient of the side mirror.
Wow. That's a great study! Thanks much!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hey @fanfare! Very good question, the design doesn't look that aerodynamic but I imagine its tiny size helps a lot. Haven't seen anything about the drag coefficient yet but in general side mirrors can add quite a bit of drag to a car. Here's a interesting study about it.


The simulation was performed at a range of velocities between 80 km/h (22.22 m/s) to 120 km/h (33.33 m/s). The results obtained from the simulation were validated with published results and show at low subsonic speeds, the drag coefficient of the car is almost constant. A shorter side mirror mount would decrease the drag coefficient of the side mirror by 1- 5%. In addition, a smaller side mirror produces a lower drag coefficient of the side mirror by 14-43%. Finally, increasing the radius of housing curvature would decrease the drag coefficient of the side mirror.
Rush! Guess what I found? I found the drag coefficient of the ICE version of this vehicle. The EV version should be a bit less because Kandi seems to have omitted extra chrome and stuff like fog lamps and door guards. But the ICE model is estimated to have a drag coefficient of: 0.36.

This is the sauce: --> The sauce. :cool:

The Aptera EV, for example has a drag coefficient of 0.13. But that might explain why K27 gets 2X the range when it is driving at 37.2 mph than when it drives at 62 miles per hour.

So, my thought are, just as the MirageForum (from the Mitsubishi Mirage enthusiasts) have come up with ways to improve drag resistance, maybe Kandi lovers should do the same. Stuff like wrapping the indentations in the front of the car and covering the wheels with smooth covers, etc.
 
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